News

U.S. Customs and Border Protection says agents arrested a Guatemalan man Thursday who entered the U.S. border illegally near a Maine port of entry.

Spokesperson Dennis Harmon said U.S. Border Patrol agents arrested a Guatemalan man near a Jackman port of entry and sent him back to Canada. The man had been living in Canada with a valid Canadian work visa. The man told agents he was trying to get to New York City to find a better paying job.

Border Patrol says that a citizen notified agents of a person walking south on Route 201 away from the international border.

An immigration checkpoint set up on I-95 in Penobscot County Wednesday resulted in the arrest of a man with an outstanding deportation order, 10 drug-related seizures and a formal warning to an immigrant who was not carrying his green card.

It has also raised questions about U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) practice of making random checks so far inland.

Ringelstein Campaign

U.S. Senate candidate Zak Ringelstein was arrested outside of a U.S. Border Patrol facility in McAllen, Texas Friday, after blocking access to a detention facility.

According to Ringelstein, the facility was holding immigrant children separated from their parents.

Ringelstein's campaign promoted his visit to Texas on social media, which said he would travel there to deliver blankets, food and toys to children detained at the border and to request access to a holding facility in the city of McAllen.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

The University of Southern Maine has received a collection of nearly half a million maps — an estimated $100 million gift that is believed to be the largest in the history of the University of Maine System.

The collection of more than 450,000 rare maps comes from Dr. Harold Osher, a cardiologist from Portland. The Osher family has previously donated many maps to the university and helped establish the Osher Map Library in 1994.

Family spokesperson Glenn Parkinson said the Oshers hope the collection is used to enhance educational opportunities for local students.

BANGOR, Maine - An immigration checkpoint set up on Interstate 95 in Maine resulted in the arrest of a Haitian immigrant with an outstanding deportation order.
 
The Bangor Daily News reports that the checkpoint was in place for 11 hours Wednesday on the southbound lanes of I-95 between the towns of Howland and Lincoln in Penobscot County.
 
Agents also made 10 drug seizures and issued a formal warning to an immigrant who was not carrying his green card. A Homeland Security spokesman says the checkpoint was designed to be minimally intrusive.
 

Contact With Toxic Browntail Moth Cocoons Can Cause Blistery Rash, State Warns

Jun 22, 2018
Courtesy Maine Forest Service / via Bangor Daily News

Maine officials are warning residents to be very careful before removing the cocoons of the browntail moth, a toxic, invasive species that is spreading throughout the state.

“Do this with extreme caution,” a media release issued Thursday from the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry, said of cocoon removal. “Cocoons are full of the hairs that can cause a rash or worse.”

Border Patrol Agents Question Drivers At I-95 Checkpoint About Citizenship

Jun 22, 2018
John Gibbins / TNS

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents set up a checkpoint Wednesday on Interstate 95, stopping drivers and asking them questions about their citizenship before letting them proceed.

Report: Former Acadia National Park Director Accepted Illegal Gifts

Jun 22, 2018

PORTLAND, Maine - A former director of Acadia National Park is accused of accepting an illegal gift in the form of a Caribbean vacation offered to him months before his retirement in 2015.

An Interior Department investigation made public Thursday lays out the case against a "senior official'' at Acadia who received the gift from board members of a nonprofit he later joined. Former Acadia Superintendent Sheridan Steele retired in 2015 and joined the Schoodic Institute.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

Friday is the last official day on the job for Maine Economic and Community Development Commissioner George Gervais. He's been at his post a record seven years, and he shared lessons learned on the job with Maine Public’s Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz.

Abukar Adan / Maine Public

Central Maine Power (CMP) and Maine's consumer advocate have agreed that electricity consumers can be charged $34 million for costs related to recovery from the October 2017 wind storm, which cut services to thousands of Mainers.

The cost will largely be offset, says Public Advocate Barry Hobbins, by a recent cut in the federal corporate tax and by changes in accounting methodology that reduces consumer liability for costs stemming from this year's March storm.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

President Trump may have signed an executive order to stop the forcible separation of immigrant children from their parents at the border, but Maine Congressperson Chellie Pingree says that's not the end of the issue. For one thing, there are caveats to the order itself, and Pingree says they raise red flags.

Maine’s 1st District U.S. House Rep. Pingree and more than 20 other Democrats will visit federal detention facilities in Texas this weekend to investigate conditions for immigrant families separated at the border.

Rebecca Conley / Maine Public

Three years from now, high school seniors in Maine will have to demonstrate proficiency in math, English, science and other core subjects in order to graduate. 

It is Thursday, and time for Across the Aisle, our foray into Maine Politics.

This week, Cynthia Dill, an attorney and former Democratic legislator; Meredith Strang-Burgess of Burgess Advertizing and Marketing who served in Augusta as a Republican; and economist Dick Woodbury, who served in the legislature as an independent spoke with Keith Shortall.

Maine's highest court has granted the LePage administration's request to delay expanding Medicaid, at least temporarily.

Medicaid expansion is supposed to take effect July 2, but the law is on hold until oral arguments in a lawsuit are heard in mid-July.

In a one-page order issued Wednesday, Chief Justice Leigh Saufley granted a temporary stay that gives the LePage administration more time to file a Medicaid expansion plan with the federal government, at least until after oral arguments on the matter are heard.

Portland officials are considering a new 200-bed homeless center on city-owned land near a facility that provides nursing and rehabilitation services.

City Manager Jon Jennings tells the Portland Press Herald he'd like to build the new facility near the Barron Center campus. It would replace the Oxford Street Shelter.

Oxford Street Shelter Director Rob Parritt says a bigger center would help more people and allow his staff to better work with service agencies that provide health and dental care. He estimates the new shelter will cost about $10 million.

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