Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Trump Administration.

Horsley took up the White House beat in 2009 after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Veteran diplomats say it could take years to assess the results of this week's nuclear summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Trump doesn't expect to wait that long.

"I think within the first minute, I'll know," whether Kim is serious about giving up his nuclear weapons, the president told reporters Saturday. "Just my touch. My feel. That's what I do."

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

President Trump said Thursday that his summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un next week could be "a great success," and held out the possibility of an unprecedented invitation to the White House for Kim if all goes well in Singapore.

For decades, President Trump has presented himself as a master dealmaker.

"I've made a lot of deals," Trump told reporters last month. "I know deals, I think, better than anybody knows deals."

That was part of the shtick on Trump's long-running TV show, The Apprentice. And it's the subject of his bestselling 1987 book, The Art of the Deal.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

President Trump says his nuclear summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is back on.

"We'll be meeting on June 12 in Singapore," Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House, after escorting Kim's top deputy, Kim Yong Chol, out of an Oval Office meeting.

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UNITED STATES ARMY FIELD BAND: (Singing) Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord. He is...

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President Trump is weighing new protections for domestic automakers, saying American auto workers have "waited long enough."

Trump met Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and instructed him to consider an investigation into possible tariffs on imported vehicles and auto parts.

A similar investigation launched last year resulted in a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum, although in many cases those tariffs have been suspended while the U.S. negotiates with exporting countries.

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Updated at 4:47 p.m. ET

President Trump cautioned that his historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un may not happen as planned.

"There's a chance, there's a very substantial chance that it won't work out," Trump said during an Oval Office photo op with the president of South Korea. "I don't want to waste a lot of time. And I'm sure he doesn't want to waste a lot of time. So there's a very substantial chance that it won't work out and that's OK. That doesn't mean that it won't work out over a period of time."

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Updated at 5:24 p.m. ET

President Trump and Vice President Pence spoke to the National Rifle Association at the organization's annual meeting in Dallas on Friday — renewing a political partnership that was briefly tested by the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

America's new top diplomat received an enthusiastic welcome at the State Dept. Wednesday, as he promised to re-energize a department that's been largely sidelined in the first 15 months of the Trump administration.

"I want the State Department to get its swagger back. We need our men and women out at the front lines executing American diplomacy with great vigor and energy," Pompeo said during his ceremonial swearing-in ceremony. "To represent the finest nation in the history of civilization, we should be proud of that."

White House officials are defending chief of staff John Kelly, after an NBC News report said President Trump had soured on his top aide — and that Kelly had repeatedly called Trump an "idiot."

Kelly issued a statement Monday calling the NBC story "total B.S."

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders dismissed rumors that Kelly might soon be reassigned and nominated to be secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Trump administration has decided to hold off on imposing most of its tariffs on imported steel and aluminum until at least June 1.

Tariffs were scheduled to take effect at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday on imports from Canada, the largest U.S. supplier of steel and aluminum, as well as Mexico, Argentina, Australia, Brazil and the EU.

A source familiar with the decision says the administration has reached an agreement in principle with Australia, Argentina and Brazil, which may avoid the need for tariffs against those countries altogether.

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We're going to turn now to NPR's Scott Horsley, who was listening to Scott Pruitt's testimony today. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good afternoon, Ari.

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