A Way of Seeing - Walter Ungerer

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Sun., April 30 at 11:30 pm

Acclaimed experimental filmmaker, Walter Ungerer, shares some of his latest in this visually thoughtful compilation.

I Just Don’t Get It – It's My Russian Soul (2015) 7:31 min.
The visual background and location of the film is Portland, Maine viewed through time-lapse photography, and presented to the viewer for interpretation and contemplation. The audio track explains the film’s title; a dialog between a young Russian man and his English girlfriend; where he explains his Vodka habit. "I just don’t get it? It’s my Russian soul. Why can’t you understand?"

Green Eye (2012) 6:36 min.
How the universe evolved, and how humans developed are questions that arise with our awareness of life on the planet. There seems always to be much conjecture about it, but no clear answers. Mystery and wonder are pervasive. This film stems from my thoughts about it. As the images I created evolved into continuous sequences, it pursued a direction hitherto unknown by me until it was a film, and finished. Does the eye at the beginning represent the all seeing eye? Is it the nucleus around which the universe swirls, or is it simply just an eye?

Ici (2013) 6:33 min.
Time lapse video clips form the basis of this work. The film begins as an evolution of abstract images continuously changing in color, shape and texture. As the film plays, it slowly reveals the source and identity of the original subject-matter. The sound track adds its own abstract utterances; only revealing recognizable tones in cadence with the visuals. At its conclusion, one is aware the purpose of the film is not only to titillate the senses, but to expose the void that goes beyond apparent reality.

Clouds (2012) 6:47 min.
The elements of air, earth and water are viewed and observed. Their interaction, or rather their relationship is contemplated by us: humans. It would be foolish not to believe it is all part of a great mystery.

Placing the Mark / Marking the Place was produced by Walter Ungerer of Dark Horse Films.