Maine Things Considered

4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Monday - Friday

Weekdays at 4 p.m. join host Nora Flaherty and hear Maine’s only daily statewide radio news program. Maine Public Radio's award-winning news staff brings you the latest news from across Maine and the region, as well as in-depth reports on the most important issues.

Sarah Redmond / University of Maine Sea Grant

A Washington County Superior Court judge has ruled in favor of several shorefront property owners who maintain that rockweed, a form of seaweed, is not a resource that falls under the public trust.

In his ruling, Justice Harold Stewart II concluded that rockweed growing in the intertidal zone is the property of the shorefront owner and should not be construed to be included under exemptions that include fishing.

Patty Wight / Maine Public

When faced with a terminal illness, some people might choose to fight it. But increasingly, doctors and patients are taking a different tack: Instead of creating a battle plan that focuses on the illness, they create an approach that emphasizes patient goals.

E'nkul Kanakan / Portland Empowered (courtesy photo)

For someone new to Maine, particularly if they have come from another country or speak a different language, education is an opportunity. But it can be intimidating. The academics are challenging, but what’s tougher for many students and their families is the language barrier.

Pat Wellenbach / Associated Press

Summer resorts around the nation are bracing for a tough season — not because the tourists won’t come, but because the workers might not. The reinstatement of a cap on visas for temporary workers has some in the hospitality industry predicting catastrophe.

Mal Leary / Maine Public/file

Gov. Paul LePage predicts that the Trump administration will re-certify the Riverview Psychiatric Center in Augusta, a move that would protect $20 million in federal funding. The governor also reiterated his unsubstantiated claim that the Obama administration’s decertification of the hospital nearly four years ago was politically motivated.

Cecile Thornton embraces Fatuma Lukusa at start of French Club. Lukusa is from the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Susan Sharon/Maine Public

There’s an old French saying, Lose your language, lose your faith. But in one part of Maine, both are being revived with the help of hundreds of French-speaking African immigrants who are connecting with local Franco American residents in ways neither ever expected. That’s changing the dialog in a community where the “language of love” was often suppressed.

David Goldman / Associated Press

PORTLAND, Maine - A major nor’easter that battered the north Atlantic coast swept across Maine Tuesday, knocking out power to tens of thousands, stranding travelers and dumping nearly two feet of snow on some parts of the state.

Maine Public/file

Described by his colleagues as a passionate defense attorney who was fearless in the courtroom, Daniel Lilley died Saturday at a Maine hospital, according to his Portland law firm.

The 79-year-old Aroostook County native was remembered by his peers as a brilliant trial lawyer who never forgot the value of the common touch.

Maine law currently prohibits police officers from engaging in fundraising for any reason, even to assist a fellow officer’s family in crisis. The legislature is considering a proposal that would carve out a narrow exception to that ban, but opponents say there are good reasons why the law is in place.

Courtesy MDI Biological Laboratory

Some animals have the ability to regenerate lost limbs. For humans, regeneration has been limited to the liver and skin. Researchers at the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory say the ability to re-grow other human tissue – like the heart – may be more possible than you think especially with their latest discovery.

Courtesy of Page Lennig

It’s budget season for school districts across the state, which are grappling with a funding proposal from Governor Paul LePage that would cut state funding by about $20 million compared to last year, and shift administrative costs back to the schools.

For the first time in decades, the length of the U.S. ski season is shrinking. And as climate change curtails winter’s length, an industry transformation is under way: one expert says most ski mountains in southern New England could be out of business in 25 years unless they diversify their offerings. But ski areas in northern New England could benefit.

A medical tourism facility project in Auburn is at a standstill. The plan to build a 5-star medical recovery center was unveiled two years ago by a Chinese investment company. But the company is waiting for approval from the federal government.

The medical tourism facility - which would cater to wealthy Chinese tourists – was originally scheduled to open this year. But Ericka Dodge, spokeswoman for Central Maine Medical Center, says hospital officials have not been in touch with the Chinese company behind the project – Miracle Enterprise – for some time.

Wikimedia Commons

As the growing season approaches, industry experts say Maine’s wild blueberry producers will likely have to slash production to keep the industry afloat. There’s been too much of a good thing, and prices are suffering.

It's Thursday and time for the Across the Aisle, our weekly roundtable on politics. This week, Dick Woodbury, an economist who served in the Legislature as an independent; Meredith Strang Burgess of Burgess Advertising, a former Republican lawmaker; and Cynthia Dill, an attorney who served in Augusta as a Democrat.

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