Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6:00 am - 9:00 am

Every weekday for more than three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Irwin Gratz and the Maine Public Radio News team bring you regional updates throughout the morning.

Maine's governor and the Legislature - actually legislatures - have battled for years over expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Next week Maine voters can get into the act. Referendum Question 2 would approve the Medicaid expansion. Maine Public’s State House Bureau Chief Steve Mistler has written a story for Maine Public.org about the history of Medicaid expansion and talks about it with Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz.

Irwin Gratz / Maine Public

Civility in public debate seems to be lacking these days. But that very lack of civility is prompting some groups to begin to actively promote it.  Dr. Carolyn Lukensmeyer is executive director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse.  She was in Portland to launch an initiative that seeks to engage 100,000 people in four states on the importance of more civil discourse.  She spoke with Maine Public Radio's Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz, who asked Dr. Lukensmeyer to start by defining civility.

 

 

       

 

 
 

 

Gary Knight / NPR

This Sunday, Maine Public Radio debuts “Hidden Brain” with Shankar Vedantum.   Shanker has been exploring the social sciences in segments for NPR’s Morning Edition program, along with a “Hidden Brain” podcast.   He talked with Maine Public Radio’s Irwin Gratz about his new show, which will run for one hour, and air Sunday mornings at 11 on Maine Public Radio.

GRATZ: Good morning sir.

VEDANTAM: Hi Irwin.

GRATZ: Tell us first how you came to this exploration of human behavior you've been on.

/ U.S. Navy

The U.S. Coast Guard’s Marine Board of Investigation Sunday released its final report into the 2015 sinking of El Faro. The freighter, captained by a Maine native, left Jacksonville, Fla.'s port for San Juan, Puerto Rico, at the tail end of September and sank after it lost propulsion and sailed into the path of category 4 Hurricane Joaquin Oct. 1.

Fifty years ago the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War was nearing its peak. Some 485,000 American troops were in South Vietnam. U.S. involvement in the war would go on for another six years.

In less than two weeks, Maine Public Television will begin airing Ken Burns’ documentary about the Vietnam War. But beginning Tuesday, on Maine Public Radio, we’re going to air a series of what we’re calling “Courageous Conversations” about the Vietnam War and its impact.

Haven Daley / Associated Press

Leaders of a special legislative committee implementing Maine's legal marijuana law say commercial licensing and sale of the drug is unlikely to begin until next summer.

The committee today completed drafting the regulatory framework for the voter-approved law, but those guidelines must first be finalized and adopted by the Legislature before the final rulemaking process can begin.

Republican state Sen. Roger Katz, co-chairman of the committee, is hopeful the process will move quickly.

Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Independent U.S. Sen. Angus King of Maine says the Senate's Russia election probe could take most of the rest of this year.

King, appearing on NBC's Meet The Press on Sunday, said the Senate Intelligence Committee is far from being able to accuse, or clear, Trump campaign officials or the president of any wrongdoing.

Irwin Gratz / Maine Public

PORTLAND, Maine - How do we get - and keep - people healthy? Some would say a visit to the doctor is a must. But Ron Deprez, president of the Public Health Research Institute in Deer Isle, tells Irwin Gratz that’s only part of the answer. The rest is detailed in a recent Maine Policy Review article Deprez wrote entitled “Population Health Improvement.” Here's an excerpt of their conversation.

 

Irwin Gratz / Maine Public

The Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram launch a series this Sunday that attempts to put a human face on the opioid crisis.  Maybe too many faces, says Dieter Bradbury, the publication's deputy managing editor for news.  Bradbury spoke about the series with Maine Public Radio's Morning Edition host, Irwin Gratz.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

CAMDEN, Maine - Immigration will be a hot topic again this week as President Donald Trump prepares to issue his new executive order this week.

PORTLAND, Maine - Maine U.S. Sen. Angus King told NPR this morning he welcomes the decision of the Justice Department Inspector General to investigate how F.B.I. Director James Comey handled the investigation of Hillary Clinton's e-mails - and, the independent senator says, what Comey said about it during the presidential campaign.

Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Environmental groups in Maine and around the country are condemning the nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency.

Over the past decade Pruitt has sued the EPA multiple times, challenging major environmental protections for clean water to standards that protect Americans from smog, haze and methane. He has also questioned the scientific basis of climate change, sending letters to the EPA written by oil and gas companies and calling the Clean Power Plan to reduce carbon pollution “unlawful and overreaching.”

The Nov. 8 election did a lot more than make Donald Trump president elect. It, of course, will change the government’s approach on a variety of issues, from business regulation to climate science, immigration, health insurance and taxation.

But the election, in which a majority of voters backed the candidate with fewer electoral votes, also touched off a wave of political protests unlike any in living memory.

University of Maine political science professor James Melcher analyzed the Maine election results for the Maine Public Radio program Morning Edition.

Early on, polls showed strong support for expanding background checks on gun sales in Maine. But closer to the election the numbers tightened, and by Tuesday evening it seemed momentum had swung to the opposition.

David Trahan, director of the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine, says voters resented interference by a gun-control group founded by New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg. And he says they particularly disliked a provision in the measure that could bar loaning or giving a gun to a friend without getting a federal background check.

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