Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6:00 am - 9:00 am

Every weekday for more than three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Irwin Gratz and the Maine Public Radio News team bring you regional updates throughout the morning.

WATERBORO, Maine — Authorities in Maine are issuing a warning after skimming devices were found on ATMs at banks in Wells, Sanford and Waterboro over the weekend.

York County Sheriff William King Jr. said Sunday that deputies found skimming devices on the machines on Saturday.

The devices are used to steal personal identification numbers and card data from bank customers. King says one device mimicked the card slot and fit over the existing card slot, making the machine look unaltered.

A new rule is now in effect in Maine to try to protect loons from lead poisoning.

Prior to 2002, lead was responsible for nearly a third of all adult loon mortality. So in 2013, Maine lawmakers passed An Act to Protect Maine Loons By Banning Lead Sinkers and Jigs.

Susan Gallo is with Maine Audubon which is part of a coalition of groups trying to encourage the purchase and use of lead-free fishing tackle. She says one provision of the law didn’t take effect until September of this year.

A longstanding mail carrier for Swan’s Island and Frenchboro has been restored to his position after he lost the contract over a dispute with the U.S. Postal Service.

For nearly three decades, LJ Hopkins delivered both mail and freight items to island residents. But last spring, USPS told him he could not combine the deliveries.

After Hopkins filed suit, the postal service amended the contract. But Hopkins’ attorney Keith Harriton says the ultimate victory was when Hopkins was awarded the position last Thursday.

SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine — The Maine Community College System has requested a 13 percent increase in state funding with a bulk of the new money set to go toward the expansion of workforce development programs.

The Portland Press Herald reports Maine’s allocation to the seven-campus system would jump from $62 million in 2017 to $70 million in 2019 if the increase is approved by lawmakers.

Maine Public/File

For this campaign season, MPBN is reuniting Sam Surprise and Brenda Garrand for their takes on campaign advertising. Surprise heads Surprise Advertising, Garrand is president of Garrand & Company.

We return to the race between Republican incumbent Bruce Poliquin and Democratic challenger Emily Cain. As Garrand tells Maine Public Radio’s Irwin Gratz, that’s because some campaigns have yet to engage.

PITTSFIELD, Maine — Maine State Police say they’ve charged an 18-year-old Manchester man with driving a Dodge Neon at 146 mph on Interstate 95. That’s more than twice the 70-mph speed limit.

Police say 18-year-old Tyler Barrows was stopped in Pittsfield, Maine, on Wednesday and was charged with criminal speeding, a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

AUGUSTA, Maine — The University of Maine at Augusta is set to offer the state’s first university-level course in operating unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones.

The Kennebec Journal reports the seven-week program begins Oct. 27 and will provide students a path to earn a Federal Aviation Administration remote pilot’s license.

GORHAM, Maine — Federal investigators are looking into the death of a 43-foot-long endangered right whale that was found off the coast of Maine with fishing gear wrapped around her body.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the adult female whale was found Friday near Boothbay with fishing gear ropes wrapped around her head, mouth, flippers and tail. She weighed about 45 tons.

The whale was towed to a Gorham farm. A necropsy was performed Sunday.

PORTLAND, Maine — Maine’s Congressional delegation has declined to release copies of its members’ 2015 tax records to a newspaper.

The Portland Press Herald reports that Congress issued a joint statement saying the members’ federally required financial disclosures provide enough transparency.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins and Independent Sen. Angus King aren’t up for re-election, while Democratic Rep. Chellie Pingree and Republican Rep. Bruce Poliquin face opponents this fall.

BANGOR, Maine — Maine Gov. Paul LePage says he can’t be wrong 100 percent of the time but that’s how he’s portrayed in the media.

LePage used a Constitution Week Forum at his alma mater, Husson University, to take a shot at the news coverage of his administration last week.

He says news reporters are more interested in a catching him in "seven-second sound bite" than issues like fighting poverty and taking care of the elderly.

Chuck Grimmett / Flickr/Creative Commons

Over the past week, we’ve been reporting on Question 1, the ballot initiative that would establish a framework to distribute, tax and regulate marijuana sales across Maine. Today, in our final installment of “High Stakes,” we head to college, where students could play a critical role in determine whether the new initiative will pass.

Independent U.S. Sen. Angus King of Maine says important legislation like a continuing resolution to prevent a federal government shutdown Oct. 1 and the National Defense Authorization Act are being held up by issues often unrelated to the bills.

“A perfect example is the National Defense Authorization Act, which my understanding is, is now being held up by the sage grouse,” he says.

Susan Sharon / MPBN

One of the big questions raised by the ballot initiative to legalize, tax and regulate marijuana in Maine is what effect it will have on the state’s medical marijuana program and the mom-and-pop economy it has created.

Patty Wight / MPBN

For some, the debate over whether to legalize recreational marijuana in Maine hangs on concerns related to criminal justice or economics. But for others, the central issue is public health.

Democratic leaders in the Maine House and Senate are sharing their vision for what they’re calling “A Better State of Maine.” Some of the ideas are a stark contrast to what Mainers have heard from Gov. Paul LePage at similar gatherings.

At a forum in Topsham Tuesday night, Democrats unveiled a general platform that calls for modernizing and repairing roads, bridges, ports and rail, expanded access to broadband, clean energy and investment in early childhood and K-12 education.

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