Governor Paul LePage

Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press File

Gov. Paul LePage had a one-sentence response to a 16-year-old who wrote to him worried about the repeal of net neutrality rules: Read a book.

LePage Keeps Making It Harder For Regular Mainers To Know Where He’s At

Nov 27, 2017
Gov. Paul LePage walks with Mike Seile, vice-president of the auto parts manufacturer Somic America, during a tour of the Brewer company's factory floor, May 5, 2017.
Nick Sambides Jr. / Bangor Daily News

With the buildup to the 2018 election in full frenzy, Maine’s political spotlight is shifting away from Gov. Paul LePage to the 20 candidates and counting who want to replace him.

Roughly 14 months before his second term ends, that appears to be the way the Republican governor wants it.

Trump Admin. Asks LePage to Reconsider Rejection of Millions in Job Training Funds

Oct 17, 2017
Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta is seen in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, during an event for military spouses to discuss the problems they face with employment, as part of "American Dream Week."
Alex Brandon / AP Photo/File

President Trump’s secretary of labor last month asked Gov. Paul LePage to rethink his decision to withdraw from a federal program that sends approximately $9 million to the state each year to pay for training for thousands of unemployed workers and helps to fund the state’s network of 12 regional career centers.

Descendant Charmane Glass-Tripp speaking at the dedication ceremony at Pineland Farms in New Gloucester honoring the people forcibly removed from Malaga Island in the early 1900s.
Patty Wight/Maine Public

More than a century after a mixed race community of fishermen and laborers were forcibly evicted and virtually erased from Malaga Island off the coast of Phippsburg, their descendants now have a permanent memorial. Today Gov. Paul LePage joined those ancestors and their supporters at Pineland Cemetery for its dedication and to begin the healing of what many consider to be one of the darkest chapters in Maine's history.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public/file

Nips, those tiny bottles of booze that Maine Governor Paul LePage wants banned, are here to stay. For now anyway. The Maine Liquor and Lottery Commission voted against the administration’s proposal to outlaw sale of the 50 milliliter bottles, which the governor says were linked to increased incidents of drunken driving and littering.

FILE: Maine Gov. Paul LePage pauses during a meeting to discuss the state's efforts to fight the opioid epidemic, Wednesday, May 10, 2017, at the State House in Augusta, Maine.
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File

Last week the Maine Department of Corrections sent pink slips to all of the workers at the Downeast Correctional facility in Machiasport, because under the budget plan proposed by Gov. Paul LePage, the facility would be closed. That budget has not been approved by the Legislature, however, and so the dispute has found its way to the Appropriations Committee.

Alaskan husky named Dakota, March 30, 2017, in Waterville, Maine. Gov. Paul LePage said he pardoned the dog from a death sentence levied at a court hearing last week, after it killed a neighbor's small pug in May 2016.
Karen Vance/Waterville Humane Society via AP

WATERVILLE, Maine - A dog that was ordered to be euthanized despite a pardon issued by Maine’s governor could get a second chance at life as a sled dog.

The Waterville Morning Sentinel reports that a state prosecutor has agreed with the dog’s previous owner and the owners of two dogs it killed to send the animal to a training shelter in New Hampshire. But the dog’s current owner, who adopted the husky after the attacks but before the euthanization order, is not on board.

A bag collects blood and deoxygenated suspension fluid in Dr. Thomas Egan's lab at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Friday, Nov. 8, 2013.
AP Photo/Allen G. Breed/file

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) _ Maine’s Republican governor is opposing a law to prohibit certain insurers from considering a person’s status as a living organ donor.

Gov. Paul LePage voted the bill Tuesday and said it would make Maine one of the only states in the nation to prohibit life, long-term care and disability insurers from such a consideration. The bill wouldn’t apply to health insurance, which already has such protections.

The House on Thursday voted 146-0 to override LePage’s veto. The bill goes to the Senate.

Maine Governor Paul LePage
www.dallasvoice.com/File

 

Gov. Paul LePage is proposing deep cuts to Maine’s welfare programs, slashing 500 state government jobs and broadening the state’s sales tax to pay for a reduction in the state income tax in his $6.8 billion two-year budget plan.

Overall, the spending plan attempts to counter an increase in the tax on high income earners passed by voters in November while furthering the governor’s longheld plan of reducing the state income tax.

 

Maine Governor Paul LePage
www.dallasvoice.com/File

 

Gov. Paul LePage is proposing deep cuts to Maine’s welfare programs, slashing 500 state government jobs and broadening the state’s sales tax to pay for a reduction in the state income tax in his $6.8 billion two-year budget plan.

Overall, the spending plan attempts to counter an increase in the tax on high income earners passed by voters in November while furthering the governor’s long-sought plan of reducing the state income tax.

 

Maine Gov. Paul LePage speaks during a conference on August 26, 2016.
File/MPBN

Gov. Paul LePage gave up on finding common ground with Democrats a long time ago, but he’s always been able to rely on the support of most Republicans in the Maine House. Now, as some Senate Republicans are eying a censure penalty, LePage will need the support of house Republicans to achieve any of his policy goals in the next legislative session. Some House Republicans say they need to need to hear more from LePage.

Maine Gov. Paul LePage speaks during a conference of New England's governors and eastern Canada's premiers to discuss closer regional collaboration, Monday, Aug. 29, 2016, in Boston.
AP Photo/Elise Amendola

AUGUSTA, Maine - Maine Gov. Paul LePage has tweeted that reports of his "political demise are greatly exaggerated.''

MPBN file

Gov. Paul LePage’s obscenity-laden voice mail rant aimed at state Rep. Drew Gattine of Westbrook continues to rock Maine’s political landscape. Members of LePage’s own party are also responding.

Maine Gov. Paul LePage speaks at a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, Wednesday, June 29, 2016, in Bangor, Maine.
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty

State lawmakers in both parties roundly denounced the governor’s voicemail and subsequent threat. Democratic leaders said he crossed a line — and that he’s unfit for office. Both LePage and Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump have demonstrated a willingness to test the boundaries of acceptable conduct for public officials — and they’ve been repeatedly rewarded for it.

At a press conference in Portland Representative Drew Gattine (D-Westbrook) told reporters that he was truly taken aback by the tone of LePage’s voicemail.

Mal Leary / MPBN

Governor Paul LePage today issued an apology to the people of Maine for a threatening and obscenity-laden voicemail he left for a Democratic lawmaker. But LePage also defended his right to be angry for assertions that he
is racist and dismissed calls for his resignation. The drama that unfolded today has been building for months.

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