Maine

Maine news

Rockweed coats the shoreline on the Maine coast.
Sarah Redmond / University of Maine Sea Grant

For 15 years, shore-front property owners, rockweed cutters and Maine Department of Marine Resources regulators have attempted to balance the competing interests that have tended to define the state’s rockweed industry. 

BANGOR, Maine - With Americans sitting on an estimated $10 billion in loose change, a new Maine nonprofit is hoping to get those coins circulating again - and get more people involved in projects that will help their communities.

It's called World of Change.

"This is a vision that I've had that I'm super excited to finally be able to see it through," says Matt Hoidal,  of Falmouth.

AUGUSTA, Maine - The Maine Education Association is coming out in support of a proposal that would require the state to mandate at least 30 minutes of daily physical activity for school children.
 
The proposal was the subject of a public hearing on Wednesday. The teachers union says a survey of its members found that schools were sometimes forced to eliminate recess to complete mandated testing.
 
The union issued a statement that "unstructured play time is as important as the classroom skills.''
 

In this Dec. 19, 2016, file photo, Maine Republican Gov. Paul LePage arrives in the House Chamber at the State House in Augusta, Maine.
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File

Retired state workers and teachers were out in force Wednesday to testify against Gov. Paul LePage’s proposed state budget. They were surprised when the governor personally came before the Appropriations Committee to defend it.

DEER ISLE, Maine - The family of the author of such classics as `"lueberries for Sal'' has donated a Maine island featured in one of his books to a conservation organization.
 
The Portland Press Herald reports that the Nature Conservancy announced Monday that the family of writer and illustrator Robert McCloskey had donated the Outer Scott Island in Penobscot Bay, off Deer Isle.
 

SANFORD, Maine - Police say the body of a Maine woman who disappeared more than a month ago has been found.
 
Forty-year-old Kerry Rear was last seen on Jan. 22 at the Lil' Mart convenience store in Sanford.
 
Police had described her as being disoriented, wet, and in stocking feet. They said she left the store and returned a short time later asking about making a bank deposit.
 
Police say Rear's body was found on Wednesday afternoon in a wooded area roughly 600 feet from the store.
 

"How Emotions Are Made"

Mar 9, 2017
http://www.hmhco.com/shop/books/How-Emotions-Are-Made/9780544133310

Scientists used to believe that emotions were hard-wired into the brain.  Barrett offers a new theory on how the brain constructs emotions and explains how a new understanding of emotions could "revolutionize psychology, health care, law enforcement, and our understanding of the human mind.” 

With the U.S. facing an almost trillion dollar backlog of unmet highway and bridge needs, Maine U.S. Senator Susan Collins chaired a Senate subcommittee hearing today Wednesday exploring how to improve the nation’s infrastructure.

Among those joining Collins at the hearing in Washington was Maine Transportation Commissioner David Bernhardt, who’s heading a national association of transportation officials. Bernhardt told the panel that assured federal funding is very important.

Maine’s high court has given a number of former full-time Shaw’s employees a victory as they pursue an age discrimination lawsuit against the grocery store chain.

In this photo taken April 6, 2016, a sign at the federal courthouse in Tacoma, Wash., is shown to inform visitors of the federal government's REAL ID act, which requires state driver's licenses and ID cards to have security enhancements.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file

A decade ago, the Maine legislature rejected a proposal to bring the state into compliance with the federal identification standards known as “Real ID.” Some now say its time that the state adopt Real ID for drivers licenses, because the feds are cracking down. But opponents cite privacy concerns.

FREEPORT, Maine - Outdoors retailer L.L. Bean is recalling some snowshoes.

The Maine outdoor retailer says it's pulling 3,000 adjustable snowshoes because the plastic material can weaken and break, posing a fall hazard.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission announced the recall Tuesday.

It says Bean reported four failures but no one was hurt.

Tech News & Advice

Mar 8, 2017
https://www.flickr.com/photos/plymouth-district-library/

The latest news from the world of high-tech: Apple is rumored to have a VR phone in the works. They have also announced their first foray into original content programming. We’ll also discuss home assistants, tablets and laptop replacement options. 

Guests:  Jared Maxfield, owner of Necessary Technology

Andrew Rosenstein, owner of Techport

Janet McKenney, Director of Library Development, Maine State Library

Fruit and vegetable displays in most supermarkets contain produce that’s well-shaped and uniform in color without any scars or other blemishes. That doesn’t mean it’s more nutritious and tasty than products that are cosmetically less than perfect. In a pilot program Scarborough-based Hannaford Supermarkets is making misfit fruits and vegetables available at a discount in 15 of its midcoast and southern Maine stores. Hannaford spokesman Eric Bloom.

PORTLAND, Maine - The U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Maine and the state's attorney general are sponsoring a contest for students to create multimedia projects about Maine's drug crisis.
 
The contest is called Youth Voices on the Opiate Crisis in Maine. The sponsors are inviting students to design and make audio, visual and written projects about the crisis.
 
Sponsors say entries can take the form of videos, public service announcements, essays, poetry, podcasts, screenplays, graphic design projects and cartoons.
 

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