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Wednesday, June 6 at 2:00 pm

Between now and Thursday, June 7, Maine Public Radio will present a series of special Your Vote 2018 primary candidate profiles in our 2 o’clock hour. On June 12, Maine voters will choose Democratic and Republican nominees for governor, and the Democratic candidate for the 2nd Congressional District seat.

Irwin Gratz / Maine Public

The Republican candidates in Maine's gubernatorial primary race are now hitting the airwaves with ads. Brenda Garrand and Sam Surprise have been watching them closely, and are back to comment on what they see and hear. 

Garrand is the owner of Garrand Mohlenkamp, Surprise runs Surprise Advertising. Garrand is also on Maine Public's board of trustees.  They gathered in our Portland studios earlier this week with Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz.

Editor's Note:  This interview was recorded late last month, and, since then, Mary Mayhew has released some campaign ads.

Mark Eves, a former Maine House speaker, is among seven Democrats running for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.

Eves was elected to the Maine House of Representatives in 2008, where he served the maximum allowed four terms, the last two as House speaker, from 2012 to 2016.

Eves earned a bachelor’s from the University of Louisville and a master’s from the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. He is a family therapist.

Maine Public’s Mal Leary asked Eves why Democrats should choose him over the field:

Janet Mills, Maine’s current attorney general, is among seven Democrats running for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.

Mills was district attorney for Androscoggin, Franklin and Oxford counties from 1980 to 1992. She was then elected to the Maine House of Representatives, where she served from 2002 to 2008.

Tuesday, June 5 at 2:00 pm

Between now and Thursday, June 7, Maine Public Radio will present a series of special Your Vote 2018 primary candidate profiles in our 2 o’clock hour. On June 12, Maine voters will choose Democratic and Republican nominees for governor, and the Democratic candidate for the 2nd Congressional District seat.

Mal Leary / Maine Public

Representatives from 126 organizations, ranging from the Maine State Chamber of Commerce to advocacy groups for direct care workers, are calling on Maine lawmakers to set a date for a special legislative session to complete their work. 

“Direct care services will be cut by 12 percent on June 30 if the Legislature doesn’t come back and prevent this crisis and fund direct care workers,” said Lydia Dawson, executive director of the Maine Association of Community Service Providers, at an Augusta news briefing Tuesday.

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Maine independent U.S. Sen. Angus King says he will vote to keep ranked-choice voting in next week’s referendum vote.

“A high number of voters said this is something they want," King says, "and I don’t like the idea that we essentially voided what the voters said.”

King says he was reluctant to publicly comment on the ranked-choice voting referendum because some will say he is doing so to benefit his re-election campaign.

Betsy Sweet is one of seven Democrats trying to win her party’s gubernatorial nomination June 12.

Sweet is a longtime lobbyist who served as director of the Maine Women’s Lobby and the Maine Commission for Women. She currently heads Moose Ridge Associates, a lobbying firm in Augusta. She has not held elected office.

Sweet told Maine Public’s Fred Bever what she thinks makes her stand out from a large Democratic field:

Democratic state Rep. Jared Golden is one of three candidates vying to challenge Republican incumbent U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin.

Golden is currently serving his second term in the Maine House of Representatives, where he is now the assistant majority leader. Golden is a military veteran who served for four years in the U.S. Marines, with deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Bates College.

Maine Public’s Mal Leary opened the interview by asking Golden what sets him apart from his two Democratic challengers:

Toby Talbot / Associated Press

A week from Tuesday, Mainer primary voters will participate in a historic democratic experiment: They'll be the first voters in the country to use ranked-choice voting in a statewide election.

Maine Public staff

A Superior Court judge has ruled that the LePage administration must expand Medicaid.

The decision, issued Monday, orders the state to submit a plan to the federal government within a week. Advocates say that means enrollment should begin on July 2, for the 70,000 people who are eligible.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

President Donald Trump has tweeted that he believes he could pardon himself under the broad Constitutional powers granted to presidents. Independent U.S. Sen. Angus King of Maine disagrees.

Trump has asserted that he has the right to pardon himself, but won’t use his power to do so since he has done nothing wrong. But King says the implication that a president can never be held accountable for his or her actions is inconsistent with other powers of the Constitution.

Monday, June 4 at 2:00 pm

Between now and Thursday, June 7, Maine Public Radio will present a series of special Your Vote 2018 primary candidate profiles in our 2 o’clock hour. On June 12, Maine voters will choose Democratic and Republican nominees for governor, and the Democratic candidate for the 2nd Congressional District seat.

Mark Dion, a state senator, is one of seven Democrats vying for a chance at the Blaine House this fall.

Dion was a Portland police officer who was first elected Cumberland County Sheriff in 1998 and served in that post until 2016. Dion earned a bachelor’s in criminology from what is now the University of Southern Maine, a master’s degree from Antioch College and a law degree from the University of Maine School of Law.

Dion was elected to the Maine House in 2010, where he served three terms. In 2016, he was elected to the Maine Senate, where he continues to serve.

Shawn Moody, founder of Moody’s Collision Centers, a Maine chain of auto body repair shops, is among four Republicans seeking the GOP nomination for governor.

In 2010, Moody ran unsuccessfully for governor as an unenrolled candidate. He graduated from Gorham High School.

Maine Public’s Mal Leary asked Moody what sets him apart from the field:

Leary: There are three other candidates in this race, and many of them are promoting the same ideas. What specific proposal or proposals make you different from your primary opponents?

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