A majority of residents have voted to end a Maine town's lawsuit with the state over summer traffic congestion.

The Kennebec Journal reports Wiscasset sued the state Department of Transportation last November, alleging that Republican Gov. Paul LePage backed away from promises and over his assertion the state didn't have to follow local ordinances.

The department said in a statement that it is "gratified" the residents have spoken in support of the state's plan to ease traffic congestion.

Mark Vogelzang / Maine Public

The voice of longtime Morning Edition newscaster Carl Kasell, who died Tuesday at the age of 84, was a familiar one among NPR and Maine Public fans. In August of 2012, Kasell paid a visit to Maine for a taping at Portland's Merrill Auditorium of the popular radio show, "Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!" We couldn't resist the opportunity to have Kasell come by our Portland studios for an interview. MPBN Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz asked him if he missed doing daily newscasts, which he retired from in 2009.

Russia said Wednesday that it has received word that the U.S. has no plans for further sanctions after confusion over the issue involving U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, who announced fresh sanctions only to be contradicted by the White House.

Russia's official TASS news agency quoted a source in the foreign ministry as confirming, "the United States has informed the Russian embassy that there will be no new sanctions for now."

Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

CARIBOU, Maine - Maine game wardens have found a new home for an orphaned black bear cub.
 
WAGM-TV reports Game Warden Alan Dudley found the cub last week in Caribou when he responded to a crash that killed its mother.
 
Dudley captured the cub in a dog kennel and brought it home. He then reached out to wildlife biologist Amanda DeMusz who recommended they place the young bear with an adult female bear that already had cubs.
 

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press/file

Mainers are expressing grief over the loss of one of the state’s most famous summer residents. It wasn’t unusual for Maine residents to encounter former first lady Barbara Bush, who spent most summers at the family compound at Walker’s Point in Kennebunkport. And while she was here, she was active in the community, devoting time to local causes, especially those aimed at improving the lives of children.

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show.

Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84.

Days after it was revealed that Fox News host Sean Hannity was a client of President Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, The Atlantic reports that the political commentator has employed at least two other lawyers with links to the president and who are also frequent guests on his show.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already she's helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. She's doing it with the help of her mom, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

CIA Director Mike Pompeo made a secret visit to North Korea earlier this month and met with leader Kim Jong Un — a meeting that "went very smoothly," President Trump said on Wednesday.

"A good relationship was formed," Trump said, adding that the direct contact with North Korea — a rare step for the U.S. — was intended to work out details of a possible Trump-Kim summit.

Updated at 10:23 p.m. ET

Former first lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday at the age of 92, according to a family spokesman.

A statement issued on Sunday by the office of former President George H.W. Bush said that Bush had elected to receive "comfort care" over additional medical treatment after a series of hospitalizations.

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